Student Profile: Jannat

Hey there! I’m Jannat, I’m from Italy, I came to Italy from Bangladesh when I was younger. I am 18 years old and I am currently studying Computer Science at Goldsmiths.

Why I came to Goldsmiths to study Computer Science 

Before coming to this fun university, I was an A-level student. I studied Maths, Computer Science, Biology and Italian. It may seem a bit of a weird combination, however, I was interested in finding similarities and differences between Artificial Intelligence and humans so I chose Computer Science and Biology.  

I chose to do Maths as I believe it is fundamental when it comes to doing any science or technology subjects. I did Italian because I did not want to forget it if I left Italy and because I love learning new languages.  

I decided to study Computer Science for my degree because I have been very interested in tech since I was young, especially programming and AI. I chose to come to Goldsmiths because I felt like they helped me to recognize my potential, even at the interview where we have talked about my A levels, what I’m currently working on and about my future.  

What I am studying 

My experience so far at Goldsmiths has been amazing. The staff and students are nice and always make me feel included. The course is fun, we get to learn through various activities during our lectures and seminars such as using Kahoot or debugging codes… 

This term we have done 4 modules: 

  • Fundamentals of Computer Science 
  • Numerical maths 
  • Programming  
  • Web development 

Currently, I am working on my individual website which is worth 60% of my marks. I am making a website about the city of Venice and its history. The content includes advice on the places you should visit and which shops you should check out if you visit. I am also working on the last stage of my games project, which very exciting as the extension requires us to add either an enemy, platform, advanced graphics or sound to our game.  

My plan for the future 

For the rest of this academic year, we will carry on studying Fundamentals of Computer Science and Programming, and start two new topics, Problem Solving and Symbolic Maths.  

Once I graduate, my plan is to work as a programmer, but I would also like to explore different sectors such as cybersecurity and AI. I also aim to visit countries where children receive poor education and do charity work with them as much as I can.  

CareerHack – the traditional careers fair reinvented

This week we ran our second CareerHack event in partnership with Hacksmiths.

What is CareerHack?

CareerHack is a career & developer event where attendees spend 4 hours competing challenges in teams, showing off their skills to potential employers.

Challenges tested technical skills, with things like building an interactive game, as well as employability skills, like writing a personal profile and skills section for your CV to get students to think about the resources they need when heading into the working world. Employers are there to let the students know more about working at their organisations.

It’s a collaboration between the Department of Computing, Hacksmiths (our student-led tech society), our Careers Department and employers.

Our employer partners, Goodboy Digital; Lewisham Homes; Richmond & Wandsworth Council; and Scored provided challenges to the hack and were judges, working their way around the 8 teams of students and awarding points.

We wanted to look at new ways of employers and students interacting and piloted the event last year to great success, including one student getting a placement and another applying successfully for a full time position on graduation.

Employer feedback from last year’s event:

“much more useful than a “traditional” careers fair.” 

“being able to watch your students do actual engineering as opposed to just talking about it was really helpful (I was able to flag a number of final year students to our recruitment team as people whose applications should be expedited, if they choose to apply).”

We’re now pulling together feedback from the CareerHack this week and will start planning for next year! Well done to the winning team.

If you’re interested in working with our students on other innovative events, talks, placements and lots more, please contact Eilidh Macdonald.

Push, Pop, Repeat – Pop-up exhibition

Written by Clémence Debaig, student in MA Computational Arts. Find out more about the students work on The MA/MFA Computational Arts Blog.


One night, 350+ visitors, 80+ students, 130+ pieces

Push, Pop, Repeat is the first pop-up exhibition of this year’s cohort – presenting works from the MA in Computational Arts and the MA in Independent Games and Playable Experience Design. On Wednesday the 22nd of January 2020, more than 350 visitors have had the opportunity to discover more than 130 artworks. 

Most students in the programme had no, or very little, programming experience when they joined in October. After only 10 weeks on the course they are already producing high quality interactive pieces, adding computing to their art practice. The exhibition hosted an incredible variety of works produced at the end of the first term, from generative projection-mapped pieces to physical computing installations. 

Selected works

Selecting works amongst more than 130 pieces is an almost impossible task, but the following pieces particularly grabbed the attention of the visitors. This selection also aims at showcasing the diversity of the projects presented during the pop-up.


Amor Serrano by Alesandra Miro Quesada

Interactive installation – Physical Computing 1

Amor Serrano tells the story of domestic violence in the Andes. Two testimonies of survivors have been recorded and translated from Spanish to English and Quechua (native Andean language). This piece pushes the audience to face the epidemic of feminicide happening in Peru and create discourse on this topic.

Technical details:  The circuit includes 6 capacitive sensors, each soldered onto a long copper wire braided inside 6 foot long hair extensions. When touching the hair, it triggers different audio tracks. Each of them narrating a testimony of a domestic abuse survivor.


A cartography of the inside out by Jakob Jennerholm Hammar

Poster – Programming for artists and designers


The program draws structures in time, continually growing over a scarce landscape. A fictional world filled with fictional habitats for fictional inhabitants is created. The work tries out ideas of mapping an interiority and turning it inside out to see what it says about it’s exteriority, or the other way around. Some important influences where gathered from cartography and architectural plans and drawings as a way of understanding and visualizing relationality. Others where graphical notation or visual scoring as a way of working with duration and events in time.

Technical details: The artwork is generated by a program written in Processing. Noise functions and pseudo randomness as well as recursion and fractals are some of the techniques used in the generative process. Printed on A2 sized wallpaper material.


Blurred Democracy by Camila Colussi

Interactive Installation – Physical Computing 1

Blurring boundaries. Blurred democracy. Two vibrating motors are connected to the word “democracy” written in copper wire. The motors react to sound. Light is reactive to distance. As you walk away, lights turn chaotic. As you get closer, lights turn on completely. The piece was created in reference to the current Chilean revolution (October 2019-present), which main massage of fight is “Until dignity becomes habit” (“Hasta que la dignidad se haga costumbre”). Until today, serious human rights violations had taken place. Sound recording: “No son 30 pesos, son 46 años”, A las Cacerolas, Colectiva 22bits. 

Technical details: The piece is a sound-light interactive sculpture, using 2 vibrating motors, a proximity sensor and led strip lights.


_chreeb.dampGrass by Keir Clyne

Interactive system and performance – Physical Computing 1 + Programming for artists and designers

_chreeb.dampGrass is a choreographic collaboration between a human user and a virtual dancer. Through the use of a specialist controller and a virtual avatar named “_chreeb”, the creative control of the improvised choreography switches between the human and non-human participants.

Technical details: The system for this performance has been made using a Processing sketch connected to an Arduino controller. The controller itself is made of several arcade buttons, LED’s and toggle switches all housed in a cardboard casing


Tantum Duck by Mattia Spagnuolo

Audiovisual performance – Advanced Audio-Visual Processing

Tantum Duck is a Hand-controlled Audio-Visual Synthesizer. By mixing computer vision, sound synthesis and mathematical visual shapes the goal was to create an instrument that allows the performer to control both audio and visual parameters at the same time. A constant correlation between the audio and visual outputs is implemented to allow the performer to focus on the sonic and visual details of his/her performance without worrying about keeping them harmonic, as they will always be. 

Technical details: The system has been realised in openFrameworks, using computer vision and color tracking to identify the controls and using frequency and amplitude modulation (FM and AM) for the sound synthesis. To follow the chaotic nature of the sounds, the visuals are based on the chaotic map Aizawa Attractor. A chaotic map is a system of differential equations whose apparently-random states of disorder and irregularities are governed by deterministic laws that are highly sensitive to initial conditions, meaning that a small change to any of its coefficients, will result in a substantial change in its output.


Automata by Clémence Debaig

Interactive wearable and performance – Physical Computing 1

AUTOMATA is a performance device allowing the dancer to move elements of the outfit by his/her movements.⁠ This piece explores the relationship between puppeteer and object, and the transfer of agency between the two. Is the dancer moving to manipulate the objects or is the movement of the objects influencing the dancer. Who is controlling who?⁠

Technical details: The dancer is wearing an accelerometer on the right arm and another one the left leg. The values received on the accelerometers control the movement of 7 servos placed on the outfit, moving mechanical parts. 3 “flowers” and the left shoulder pad are controlled by the right arm. 2 other “flowers” are controlled by the left leg.⁠⁠ Particular attention has been put on the analysis of the acceleration values on each axis (X, Y, Z) to determine with one to use and set different thresholds for each servo.⁠


X Y Plotter Drawing Machine by Chia Yang Chang

Installation – Physical Computing 1

Drawing machines have been explored for a while but it is still a recurring theme to observe the differences in drawing between Robot and Human. Drawing is a way to express one’s humanity. However, would it be possible for robots to express the essence of being a robot through drawing? This project is presented more as an experiment than an artwork, aiming at reflecting on the meaning of what the essence of a robot is and observing the similarities between human and robot.

Technical details: The drawing machine is using an Arduino and a Processing sketch, connected via serial. The Processing sketch extracts vector points from an SVG file and then sends it to the Arduino to define the position of the pen.


The Chicken of Tomorrow by Annina Huhtala

Projection mapping – Workshops in creative coding

The Chicken of Tomorrow is a projection mapping work devoted to chicken. Combining archive video material and the latest research, it tells the brief story of a bird turned into a commodity. The visuals plays with naïve form and bright colours, yolk yellow, egg white and wattle red. They represent our simple attitude towards chicken. The piece begins with a nostalgic clip of children playing with fluffy chicks. According to studies, we now struggle to consider chicken as animals.

Technical details: The work was created in openFrameworks, mixing generative graphics, typography and videos.

A day in the life: Zala

Zala is a Year 1, BSc Creative Computing student at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Progressing from the well-established secondary school routine to a completely new independent and self-initiated university one, is a rather big change, but so is moving from a town of 100 000 people to a city with a population 4-times the size of my whole home country. Here is how I spend an average weekday in my new life.

Establishing a morning routine

Although my days differ due to my varied timetable, having an established morning routine gives them some structure, which I believe is vital to maintain my productivity and motivation. Since this term none of my classes begin before 12 and I live nearly on campus, I do not have to rush to wake up early in the morning and usually wake up around 8 after, hopefully, a good amount of sleep. I put on a jumper and head straight into our flat kitchen to make some breakfast. After changing and stretching a bit, I opt between going to the library or staying at home to catch up with lectures or work on projects.

Lectures, labs, tutorials

Then come the lectures. After spending the majority of the first term learning the fundamentals of computing and programming, we’re now starting to specialise by taking classes such as Generative Drawing, Graphics, Sounds and Signals and developing an independent creative project, which seems like it’s going to challenge us and our way of thinking quite a bit. As we’re just at the start of the new term, I’m not quite sure what’s in store for us for each specific module, although after having the first lecture of Generative drawing, I’m positive it is going to be one of my favourite classes. For a visual person as I am, Graphics sound interesting as well.

Finishing the Day

As most of my classes finish in the late afternoon, that does not leave me with much time before the evening. On days when I do have extra time, I might head to the campus gym, attend a society meeting/social or go to any event that Goldsmiths’ organises and I find interesting. By the time I get back, my flatmates are in as well and we spend our evenings eating and chatting in our kitchen, which serves as our main social space. We also might head to a pub or on occasion a party. I end my day by reading, watching a movie or talking with friends and family from back home.

Then, we repeat.

Staff Profile: Evan Raskob

In this post we meet Evan Raskob. Evan runs MA modules in Physical Computing and is pursuing a PhD in “liveness in physical computational art & design”. He also performs as a livecoding musician under the name BITLIP.  

Evan Raskob, left, live-coding at an event in New York

Evan originally hails from the picturesque town of Mahopac in New York State. His father was a dentist and his first interest in computing sparked from reading computing magazines in his office waiting room. At high school, he was inspired by a friend’s father who worked at IBM to use his burgeoning technology skills to create text based adventure games for other students, in the manner of the text-only BBS games that were popular at the time like Legend of the Rd Dragon (LoTRD) and others. He then managed to land himself a summer internship at Bell Labs in New Jersey, the iconic home of the creators of C++ and birthplace of both transistors and the laser.  

Evan went to study at Cornell, then moved away from small town life and relocated to New York City for postgraduate study on the Interactive Telecommunication Program (ITP) at NYU.  During this time, he was also involved with Julie Martin and Robert Whitman, some of the remaining founding members of  Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T), an influential and forward-thinking collective of artists and engineers. He immersed himself in creative interactive technology and became particularly interested in building his own digital instruments and audio-visual “controllers”.  

His passion in making his own musical, digital DIY/punk instruments has continued. He performs under the artist name BITLIP, where he explores making music through live coding and particularly using 3D printers as instruments. In 2019 Evan was quoted in the New York Times about his live coding:  

“The great thing about punk is they played three chords, and you said, ‘I could do that,’” Evan said. “With live coding, you type in a few lines and hit compile and you’re playing music.” 

This experience has shaped his work in the UK. Evan relocated to London in 2006 and has since worked at the University of Creative Arts, Kingston University and Ravensbourne University teaching and developing courses in Design, Coding and Computer Games. He then went on to work at the Royal College of Art, where he ran the “Mixed Reality Design” theme exploring VR/AR and sensory design.  


The CyberAnthill, Evan Raskob

Evan joined Computing at Goldsmiths in 2018. He lectures in Physical Computing and takes part in teaching trips to China. At the same time he is working toward a PhD titled “liveness in physical computational art & design”. In particular, he is looking at live computational and procedural sculpting with computer numerical control and 3D printing, augmented by virtual reality/augmented reality and machine learning. 

Computing student wins J.P. Morgan’s Code for Good

Students at JP Morgans Code for Good
Melat, in the centre, with team mates from other London universities

BSc Computer Science student, Melat Gebreselassie, is on the winning team for J.P. Morgan’s annual hackathon, Code for Good.

JP Morgan’s annual Code for Good programme gives participants the chance to use their coding skills to build creative solutions for problems faced by not-for-profit organisations.

Melat’s team worked with Project Access, who run an international mentorship programme to help students from disadvantaged backgrounds navigate applying for university. The team had to address the issue that the huge amount of data available online about university applications can be overwhelming.

“The challenge was to find a solution for students age 16-18 all around the world who have very little knowledge in how they should apply, where they should apply etc. in one place online in an accessible simple way” Melat said.

Melat and her team decided the best approach was to create a chatbot implanted into Facebook messenger, which would be accessible to young people who are used to texting and messaging through social media. They used Google’s machine learning brain, DialogFlow, to power the chatbot. This means that the more chatbot is used the better the algorithm becomes.

Melat’s BSc Computer Science degree was important as she used knowledge of node.js to build the chatbot, a coding language she is currently learning in her Data and the Web module taught by Dr. Elaheh Homayounvala.

Her team completed the challenge in just 16 hours, and after presenting to an audience of 400 people and 5 judges, were announced the winners of the competition.

Congratulations to Melat and the team!

Games Library Night

Games Library Night at Goldsmiths, University of London

For the second year in a row, at Goldsmiths we have celebrated the connection between our library and the world of games. The social space in the library is an incredible setting for showcasing games and have a friendly meetup and talk sessions with people from the game industry.

Plus, we had popcorn, cupcakes and tea for getting cosy and relaxed as the reading week is fading out and the winter is kicking in.

Across the evening we showcased many student games, some of which are making their own way to publishing and hitting the market. We played and talked together, giving and receiving feedback.

After a brief opening by Eve Jamieson and Alan Zucconi we’ve welcomed on stage our speakers.

Jupiter Hadley has introduced the audience to her job as a journalist and a reviewer, pointing out what are the elements that stand out in independent and game jam games.

Allan Cudicio, the second speaker of the evening, talked about how to research precolonial Africa for games. His talk was very well received, especially given how strong the discussion about decolonising the library currently is.

Anisa Sanusi closed the event talking about her mentorship programme for underrepresented genders in the game industry. We think this discussion is extremely relevant and important in an industry that is changing a lot and which is not always welcoming people in the best way.

We recorded all of the talks, which you can see in this playlist:

We’ve literally filled the space up to the brim and the Games Library Night has been a success for Goldsmiths. The feedback has been great, and the event was also featured on Timeout London.

Alan Zucconi, Federico Fasce, Eve Jamieson and Pete McKenzie