Goldsmiths Computing student shortlisted for Undergraduate of the Year

A third year Computing student has made it into the final of Target Jobs’ Undergraduate of the Year, in the Science & Computing category.

The organisers describe their ideal winner as “someone who can demonstrate a real passion for technology and the ability to communicate their innovative mindset with others”. They will win a month’s internship at FDM, a global professional services provider with a focus on IT.

highres_2665890643rd year Francesco Perticarari got through to the assessment stage by completing maths, computing and psychometric tests, and writing about a piece of technology that he is working on.

“At the moment, I’m building Silicon Roundabout, an online hub to help startups and tech ideas at any stage of development connect with investors, early adopters, and software developers / employees.

“When I got through to the assessment day, I wasn’t sure about what to expect and I remember walking in fairly casual, only to find out that everyone else was in a suit. Despite that I felt fairly relaxed because all the other attendees were quite friendly and fun and we linked up quickly. We were asked to do a group test including time management, organisational skills, and presentation.

“After that we had individual interviews. I was asked to explain why I should win this internship and I said: Because I’ve worked really hard, and if I don’t know something, I keep looking for the right people who can help me, and then annoy them until I get it.

Last week the organisers announced that Francesco had made it into the top ten. The winner will be announced at a networking lunch event in April. The business-savvy student says: “This event will give me a chance to connect with interesting people in the industry that could possibly help my Silicon Roundabout project gain traction.”

Good luck, Francesco!


🍕 ‘Secret language’ of emoji revealed

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People create their own ‘secret languages’ by attaching lasting alternative meanings to emoji unrelated to what they are designed to represent, according to a study from Goldsmiths Computing.

In people’s secret languages emoji of pizza or wedges of cheese mean ‘I love you’ (because these were foods people love), a bathtub emoji means a coffin (because it was the closest to a coffin shape), and a thinking face means ‘lesbian’ (because the position of the thumb and forefinger on the chin means ‘lesbian’ in American Sign Language).

These alternative meanings can be assigned randomly but become permanent and are used consistently over time between partners, friends, or family members, the research found.

The study, by researchers from Goldsmiths and the University of Birmingham, is due to be presented at the Computer Human Interaction 2018 conference in Montreal, Canada (21-26 April 2018).

In 2016 there was a furious customer backlash against Apple for changing the rendering of its peach emoji to look smoother. Researchers found that most Apple users were using this emoji to refer to buttocks, with only 7% referring to the foodstuff, and were angry the redrawn emoji did not fit this alternative meaning.

The Goldsmiths-led team launched an online survey to investigate how individuals personalise emoji to create ‘secret’ meanings. Those responding reported repurposing 69 different emoji for secret communication with the most common emoji chosen being an octopus, the most common emoji for an affectionate name being a penguin, and the most common category of emoji used ‘Animals & Nature’.

Dr Sarah Wiseman, lecturer in Computer Science at Goldsmiths and co-author of the study, said: “While we know some fruit and vegetable emoji have been repurposed by many people to mean something else, we were intrigued to find out about personal instances of this – examples of emoji that have a special meaning for just two people. Often this was about more than just typing something more quickly: people found that by using emoji they could convey very complex meanings and thoughts with them that could not be described in words.”

Of the survey’s 72 respondents (134 participants in total) who reported repurposing emoji:

  • 47% exchanged them with partners and 28% exchanged with friends
  • 21% used the emoji to express some form of affection
  • 19% used them to symbolise a particular person or pet
  • 7% used them to refer to sex
  • 6% used them to be covert while referring to sex or illegal activity

Dr Sarah Wiseman said: “Our study shows that people use emoji in a similar way to nicknames or slang, as a handy shortcut to what they mean, which through consistent use creates an intimate ‘secret language’ others don’t understand. Creators of emoji need to bear in mind the subtle way that people repurpose them and the impact even small visual changes to them could have on these alternative meanings.”

A report of the research, entitled Repurposing emoji for personalised communication: Why  🍕means “I love you” will be presented at the Computer Human Interaction 2018 conference in Montreal, Canada (21-26 April 2018).


Adapted from an article first published on Goldsmiths News.

Fifteen reasons to be cheerful

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January is over and the days are getting longer, so we’re in the mood to post a list of fifteen things from the past 12 months that we’re proud of. 

  1. We set up a playable library of computer games in the ground floor of the library.
  2. We ran our best ever Digital Arts Computing exhibition in April
  3. Our academics shared their research with students on Wednesday afternoons. More to come soon…
  4. Our Music Computing students set up Resolution, a programme of live music and visual performances
  5. Hacksmiths ran a ton of amazing events, including Non Binary in TechGlobal Game Jam, Anvil Hack, and our Welcome Week student get-together DoC.Hack.
  6. We hired Eilidh Macdonald to be our Industry Employability Champion who develops opportunities for placements, internships and other collaborations with employers.
  7. We ran an international art & tech symposium ‘Future Mind’ with our new friends at Kyoto University
  8. Post Doc Researcher Perla Maiolino exhibited at the Science Museum’s ROBOTS show
  9. Our EAVI (Embodied AudioVisual Interaction) research group ran a brilliant day of audiovisual workshops and performances at the ICA
  10. We launched five new online courses in Virtual Reality
  11. Our students were on primetime BBC1 telly
  12. We took part in an acid house revival
  13. Sex Tech Hack 2!
  14. Our students won a prize at the Living Data City Challenge hackathon in Eindhoven
  15. London Evening Standard named senior lecturer Dr Kate Devlin ‘one of London’s most influential people of 2017’

If you think of any more, send your suggestions to p.fry@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths and V&A announce Computational Arts Residency

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Goldsmiths’ Department of Computing and the V&A Digital Programmes team have announced their inaugural Computational Arts Residency.

The three-month residency is open to artists who have a strong interest in producing computational art. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds, from performance, visual art and literature to science. What we are interested in seeing is how their background has been combined with their interest in computation.

Awarded to two computational artists, the residency includes:

  • three months’ access to state-of-the-art computing facilities at Goldsmiths, University of London
  • mentorship from Irini Papadimitriou, Digital Programmes Manager at the V&A
  • rich interaction with the academic community at Goldsmiths Computing
  • a £500 stipend

Each artist will research and develop new work during Summer 2018, and produce a piece that will feature in the V&A’s Digital Design Weekend in September 2018.

Application deadline: 1 March 2018
Start date: Summer 2018 for 3 months (dates flexible within reason)

The residency is open to computational artists (or artist-duos, but not collectives) who have a strong interest in producing computational art. They should have some technical expertise and will probably be able to code in at least one language which they use in their practice. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds, from performance, visual art and literature to science. What we are interested in seeing is how their background has been combined with their interest in computation.

More information about applying for the residency

3rd year Music Computing students create DOG LUNGS mixtape

To celebrate the impending end of 2017, Music Computing students have compiled DOG LUNGS, a mixtape of recent compositions.

Third year students Henrik Blomfelt, Ed Cain, Jasper Kirton-Wingate, Dimitris Kyriakoudis, Franceso Perticari and Charles Vaughan contributed tracks, which were mixed by Tom Webster.

Track listing

  1. Response to ET – Charles Vaughan
  2. Conversation – Henrik Blomfelt
  3. Colour – Edward Cain
  4. Classified – Dimitris Kyriakoudis
  5. Response to John – Charles Vaughan
  6. Do u Know – Jasper Kirton-Wingate
  7. SAT1 – Edward Cain
  8. Urbi Requem Nocturnam – Franceso Perticari
  9. Response to Wolfgang – Charles Vaughan

Many of the artists are also involved in Resolution, a music and art event series which takes place in St James Hatcham Building, the former church on Goldsmiths campus.


Listen on Mixcloud

Beyond sex robots: the real sex tech revolution

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Goldsmiths press office Pete Wilton interviewed Dr Kate Devlin ahead of Sex Tech Hack II, where experts gather at Goldsmiths to discuss and make new kinds of intimate technology.


Sex robots are all over the news but is the technology as advanced as some suggest or could the real sex tech revolution look very different? This Friday (24 November 2017) Sex Tech Hack II will see experts gather at Goldsmiths, University of London to discuss and make new kinds of intimate technology.

Ahead of the event I talked to Dr Kate Devlin, Senior Lecturer in Computing at Goldsmiths, who is researching a new book about sex robots and was recently named on the Evening Standard’s Progress 1000 list, about how to separate scientific reality from electric wet dreams…

Pete Wilton: What myths about ‘sex robots’ need debunking?

Kate Devlin: That they exist. They don’t really, despite the flurry of media stories. There are mechanised sex dolls with some chatbot AI, but that’s about it. But they are being developed, and they currently extend the sex doll market, rather than looking at new or innovative forms. Like much technology, it’s very hetereonormative: these tend to be dolls made by men, for men. The hypersexualised female form is presented as the default.

PW: Which sex tech developments should we be most concerned or hopeful about?

KD: Sex tech has great potential to bring people happiness, whether it’s by enhancing pleasure and fun or providing a sex life for someone who – for psychological or physiological reasons – might face difficulties otherwise. It’s an industry estimated at around $30 billion worldwide and climbing.

New technologies can forge new forms of intimacy. Smart toys can be connected via the Internet, helping long distance relationships, for example, or changing the landscape of sex work, such as the cam industry. That said, there are areas that need close attention: security and privacy issues are key. The past year has seen at least three security and privacy vulnerabilities in smart sex toys.

PW: What are the major challenges to advancing this area of technology?

KD: Funding is problematic: in industry, venture capitalists don’t tend to fund sex tech as they have vice clauses that prohibit them from investing in adult ventures. Start-ups are reliant on angel investors.

Academia doesn’t fare much better: it seems that the best way of funding research into sex is to spin it from a health point of view. There’s also an attitude that research into sex and intimacy is trivial, which seems odd as for many people it’s such an intrinsic part of being human.

PW: How can initiatives like ADA-AI help to change the Artificial Intelligence agenda?

KD: ADA-AI is a new international non-profit organisation focused on evaluating, developing and lobbying around AI policy and regulation. I am one of 25 advisors and we look at how to ensure AI can contribute positively to society, especially for marginalised and underrepresented groups.

The current threat of AI is not superintelligence and a robot takeover; instead, it’s the unconscious bias in datasets and the lack of diversity being perpetuated and reinforced by systems that are now integrated into our lives.

PW: What do you hope will result from Sex Tech Hack II?

KD: Last year’s Sex Tech Hack was a great success and 50 people made 14 wonderful new examples of intimate technology. This year we have more people attending, plus a discussion day on Friday 24 November, with industry and academic experts giving talks and leading break-out sessions.

Hacksmiths, the SU tech society, have done an amazing job bringing it all together. We’ve ended up with an incredibly diverse group of attendees all set to make accessible, fair, fun prototypes. This year’s challenges are: “intimacy”, “accessibility”, and “personalisation”.

PW: How is work on your upcoming book going? What topics will it cover?

KD: The book (Turned On: The Science of the Sex Robot) continues and the deadline approaches – I wish I could say I’m as close to finishing as I should be! It’s a popular science book about sex robots – the origins of the narratives, which go right back to Greek myth, through to the sci-fi portrayals in films today. I’m writing about artificial intelligence, robotics, attachment, love, ethics and law. Send me your bad puns.


First published in Goldsmiths News, 21 November 2017