← Subscribe here to win GUEST, GHOST, HOST: MACHINE! tickets

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We’re giving away six tickets worth £10-£15 to the Serpentine Gallery’s all-day marathon of talks, readings and performances on artificial intelligence, machines, trans-humanism and non-linear time.

Where: City Hall, Queen’s Walk, London SE1 2AA
When: 10am – 11pm Saturday 7 October 2017

GUEST, GHOST, HOST: MACHINE brings together artists, scientists, activists, engineers, poets, sociologists, philosophers, filmmakers, writers, anthropologists, theologians and musicians to consider the advent of ‘artificial intelligence’, consciousness, interspecies cooperation, machines, trans-humanism and non-linear time.

COMPETITION NOW CLOSED

If you don’t win, you can buy tickets here. But you’re all winners, really, because you’re subscribed to the Goldsmiths Computing blog :)

Find your way to Computing labs at Goldsmiths

Newcomers sometimes find it difficult to find their way around the Goldsmiths campus, so here’s a video guide to locating our Computing labs:

  • RHB 306, Richard Hoggart Building
  • RHB 306a, Richard Hoggart Building
  • St James Block 3 ground floor
  • Hatchlab, G11 Hatcham St James Building
  • WB 219 and Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre, Whitehead Building

NB: All of these labs are wheelchair accessible, but the directions below sometimes assume an ability to climb stairs. Please contact us if you need accessible directions.


RHB 306, Richard Hoggart Building
The big computing lab on the second floor of the Richard Hoggart Building (the main, old red brick building). From reception, turn left and go up the red corridor. Take Staircase B to the second floor. Then take the 4-5 steps in front of you, and head left into RHB 306.


RHB 306a, Richard Hoggart Building
You’d think that this would be right next to RHB 306, wouldn’t you? It is, but you access it from the other side of the building. From the Richard Hoggart Building reception, turn right and go up the white corridor. Take Staircase F to the second floor. Go straight ahead into RHB 306.


St James Block 3 ground floor
This is the most difficult to find! From Goldsmiths College Green, go down the back of the Whitehead Building. Follow the road down the hill until you reach TCIDA (Tungsten Centre for Intelligent Data Analytics). Turn right and walk towards St James Block 3, which looks like a big mobile classroom.


Hatchlab, G11 Hatcham St James Building
This is the cool maker space in the back of ‘the church’. From Goldsmiths College Green, go though the gate at the top of Laurie Grove. Go down the little alleyway next to the Laban Centre, and you’ll see the church in front of you. Hatchlab (aka G11) is at the back of the ground floor. Wheelchair users can take the side entrance on the left of the building. If you’re coming from New Cross Road, watch this video instead.


WB 219 and the Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre, Whitehead Building
The Whitehead Building is the modern yellow building on the College Green. Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre is on the ground floor. WB 219 computing labs are upstairs.


Welcome (back) > Goldsmiths Computing induction week 2017

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The new academic year starts on Monday 25 September with a week of welcome activities before teaching starts on Monday 2 October 2017.

The week includes a six-hour creative hackathon, undergraduate and postgraduate social events, a careers workshop, and induction sessions for all new and returning students.

Freshers studying BMus/BSc Music Computing and BSc Computing & Chinese will also join activities organised by the Music Department and Confucius Institute respectively.

DoC.Hack, our welcome week hackathon is organised by student tech society Hacksmiths. For six hours, you’ll design and build tech projects – and meet students & staff from across the department in a relaxed, informal environment. No special skills needed – just bring a laptop. Limited tickets – registration essential

Update: We have now published students’ personalised timetables. These are still subject to some change until teaching starts on 2 October, so we urge you to check it regularly.


Monday 25 September

  • Year 2 induction, 2.30-3.30, Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre, Whitehead Building
  • Year 3 induction, 3.45-4.45pm, Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre, Whitehead Building
  • Employability & work placements workshop, 5pm, Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre

Tuesday 26 September

Wednesday 27 September

  • Foundation and Year 1 induction, 10.30am, Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre

Thursday 28 September

  • PhD/MPhil induction, 3pm, Lecture Theatre, Ben Pimlott Building
  • Undergraduate social, 5pm, College Green Marquee

Friday 29 September

  • Postgraduate induction, 2.30pm, Room 304, Richard Hoggart Building
  • Postgraduate social, 4-6pm, New Cross House, London SE14 6AF

Download your full schedule (PDF)


Contact computing@gold.ac.uk for any Computing-related enquiries.
Contact admissions@gold.ac.uk for enquiries about joining the university.

Goldsmiths academics develop groundbreaking online courses in Virtual Reality

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Coursera, the global leader in online education and learning, has launched its first series of courses on Virtual Reality, developed by Goldsmiths Computing lecturers.

The VR Specialisation, comprising five course modules, has been developed by Dr Sylvia Pan and Dr Marco Gillies, based on a combined 25 years’ experience in some of the world’s most prominent Virtual Reality research labs.

Their expertise in Virtual Reality centres on the generation of interactive and engaging virtual characters, one of the focus areas in the new Specialisation they teach on Coursera.

“Many of the mistakes made by Virtual Reality content creators come from not understanding the psychology of how VR works and what it means for how we create content, which is an important feature of this Specialisation,” said Dr Marco Gillies.

“In Virtual Reality users need to physically interact so they feel present in the surrounding environment. This means other characters must respond in the same way they would in the real world. These courses combine theory – the basic psychology of how VR works – with practical production skills. All the time learners are doing the practical work, they are also having to think about the psychology behind it.”

“Another important part of this Specialisation is Social VR. Social interactions in Virtual Reality are such a powerful experience; Users are sharing the space with someone who is life size, so the body language works in a way it doesn’t on a regular screen.”

Learners will get hands-on experience using many of the leading technology tools for Virtual Reality content development, and in particular the world leading game development project Unity.

“The potential for Virtual Reality to change the way we work, learn, and play is significant, but we need more people educated in VR technologies and design to get there,” said Jessica Lindl, Unity’s Global Head of Education.

“This series of courses from the University of London is a great example of a credential that can really help anyone interested in applying Virtual Reality in the work that they do.”

Dr Sylvia Pan, lecturer in graphics at Goldsmiths, said: “The launch of the Virtual Reality Specialisation presents a real opportunity to use online learning to grow the number of people equipped with the skills required to become VR content creators. Learners will take the skills developed in each of the preceding courses and put these into practice to develop their own Virtual Reality game.”

“The development of Virtual Reality courses is pivotal to cementing the role the technology will play in everyday life and across enterprises. The creative industry has naturally become the first sector to integrate Virtual Reality. However, the potential applications range across many industries, including healthcare, engineering, online collaboration, and more. The medium of Virtual Reality is developing rapidly and those making content now are creating the fundamentals of the technology. We are really excited that our learners will be able to contribute to the future of Virtual Reality.”

The specialisation comes in five courses that will be released starting on 25 September 2017.

  1. Introduction to Virtual Reality
  2. 3D Models for Virtual Reality
  3. 3D Interaction Design in Virtual Reality
  4. Building Interactive 3D Characters and Social VR
  5. Creating Your First Virtual Reality Game

Unlock molecular secrets with BioBlox VR

BioBlox, a VR game which tackles how biological molecules fit together, exhibits at this year’s New Scientist Live.

BioBlox is the result of a collaboration between researchers at Imperial College London and Goldsmiths, University of London. It turns the science of how proteins fit together (or ‘dock’) with smaller molecules, such as medicines and vitamins, into a Tetris-style puzzle game and quiz. Players manipulate and dock molecules into proteins to score points and earn bonus powers in a race against time.

First launched as a 2D mobile game, Bioblox is now available as a 3D desktop game and Virtual Reality experience – which exhibits at New Scientist Live 2017.

Where: New Scientist Live, ExCel Centre, London E16 1XL
When: 28 September – 1 October 2017
Tickets and info


How molecules dock onto proteins is the key to understanding processes in the cell, and in particular to designing new drugs to treat conditions such as cancer and Alzheimer’s. The complex 3D forms of such molecules – resembling the bumpy surface of an asteroid full of pits and craters – make understanding how they fit together extremely challenging.

The researchers designed the game to be fun but also to help players learn about protein research and it could be used in schools to teach chemistry and biology. The quiz asks players to name a biological molecule from its description – for example asking them to name the molecule that is used by our cells to produce energy later identified as glucose.

Professor William Latham, from the Department of Computing at Goldsmiths, and Creative Director of the project, said: “In BioBlox2D we open the world of protein docking to the mass market casual games player, where they have fun playing our puzzle game but at the same time learn about the science.”

Professor Michael Sternberg, from the Department of Life Sciences at Imperial and one of project leads, said: “We were inspired by a scientific problem to develop a fun-to-play game where players can experience the challenges of matching both shapes and electrical charges, which is central to how life works.”

The researchers say the block-slotting gameplay is given an original twist as players also have to match positively charged blocks with negatively charged ones – a reference to the binding mechanisms of real proteins. Successfully clearing blocks unlocks information and bonuses such as slowing time and automatically completing a level.

The team have also released a 3D version at the same time as the 2D version, and hope to make it possible to crowdsource the protein docking problem through citizen science challenges.

The intention with BioBlox3D and BioBloxVR is to simulate the protein docking problem with far greater realism in 3D and potentially solve real-world problems. At the moment, the pre-set models in the game come from an existing protein database, but players will soon have the ability to upload their own protein data and experiment in 3D and VR.

Frederic Fol Leymarie, Professor of Computing at Goldsmiths and co-lead on the project, said: “It is hoped this will provide the building blocks for people to create citizen science challenges to, for instance, crowdsource the search for new drug molecules.”

The project was supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).


This article was written in June 2017 by Pete Wilton and originally posted in Goldsmiths News. It was updated on 21 September 2017 to include news of Bioblox VR at New Scientist Live.


Goldsmiths Computing at Ars Electronica 2017

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Goldsmiths Computing staff, students and alumni showed up in force at this year’s Ars Electronica festival of art, technology and society.

The festival, which ran in Linz on 7-11 September 2017, is considered one of the most important international platforms for digital art and media culture.

Senior lecturer Rebecca Fiebrink gave a talk titled Machine Learning as Creative, Collaborative Design Tool in the AI and Creativity session. Her software the Wekinator was also used by Chicks on Speed member Alex Murray-Leslie in a performance titled The Liberation of the Feet.

Memo Akten, IGGI PhD student and 2013 winner of the top prize at Ars Alectronica, exhibited two pieces: FIGHT and Learning To See. He also gave a talk titled Intelligent Machines That Learn: What Do They Know? Do They Know Things?? Let’s Find Out! at the AI Other I symposium.

Creative Computing graduate Terence Broad received an honorary mention for the Prix Ars Electronica in the Computer Animation/Film/VFX category, for his work Autoencoding Blade Runner.

Goldsmiths researchers Prof William Latham and Lance Putnam showed Mutator VR in the festival’s gallery spaces, with continuous queues for 5 days.

Former PhD student Marco Donnarumma received an Award of Distinction in the Prix Forum II – Digital Musics and Sound Art category for his performance work Corpus Nil, which he co-produced during his PhD while working on our Meta Gesture Music project.


OVERLAP Computational Arts degree show 2017

ma-comparts

On Thursday 7 September 2017we launch OVERLAP, the 2017 final degree show for our MA/MFA in Computational Arts.

The weekend-long exhibition explores the exciting new waves originating from the intersection of art and technology. It features installations, interactive virtual and augmented realities, and conceptual works by mixed-disciplinary artists from fields as diverse as fine art, dance, photography, graphic design, puppetry, sound art, and architecture.

On Saturday 9 September, we are running a Computational Arts Family Day, where the artists will demonstrate their work to children, parents, teenagers and teachers.

WHERE
St James Hatcham Building (‘the church’)
Goldsmiths, University of London
New Cross
London SE14 6AD

Opening night
6pm-9pm Thursday 7 September 2017

Exhibition continues
10am–7pm Friday 8 September 2017
12noon–8pm Saturday 9 September 2017
12noon–6pm Sunday 10 September 2017

OVERLAP on Twitter  /  OVERLAP website


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