Student invents fabric circuit boards as tech teaching aids

Elisabetta Motta

A third year student from Goldsmiths Computing has developed a unique felt circuit board to enable primary school children to learn about electronics.

The project, ‘Felt-e’, was created by BSc Creative Computing student Elisabetta Motta as a potential new resource for teaching physical computing to children.

She said: “My research into primary schools found that teachers in computing lessons often lack the resources and time to enthuse young boys and girls about the subject. Felt-e provides a unique, hands on experience for kids and allows them to be creative while learning about electronics. It’s also a resource that’s easy to understand for teachers who might be unfamiliar with computing.”

Elisabetta, 28, surveyed a number of teachers during her initial research, exploring the frustrations of many Key Stage 1 and 2 teachers around lack of computing knowledge and pressures to prioritise literacy and mathematics.

Common feedback included a difficulty keeping pupils focused and lack of resources to run hands-on activities, which inspired the design of the Felt-e board.

Similarly laid out to a breadboard – a commonly used electronic tool which allows the user to lay out components – Felt-e includes two bus strips and ten terminal strips. Each strip has metallic poppers, to which the user can connect ‘wires’ and other components.

The longer wires have one popper on one end to connect to the board, and a crocodile clip on the other end to connect to the micro controller. The shorter wires have poppers on each end so connect points on the board.

Components are made from white felt with drawings of the relevant electronic symbol on one side and positive and negative signs on each end (if relevant to the component). The circuit is also compatible with micro controllers including the BBC micro:bit.



This post was adapted from an article by Chris Smith published on Goldsmiths News.

Generation 2018! Undergraduate Computing degree show

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Thursday 7 June sees our annual celebration of achievement by undergraduate students from across the department.

A mash-up of exhibition, show-and-tell, performance and academic conference, GENERATION is a showcase of outstanding computing projects realised by undergraduates in 2017-18. It’s an exhibition for anyone who’s interested in how digital technology and computer science is impacting on health, education, business and entertainment.

This year we have a lots of computer games, as well as virtual reality experiences, augmented reality apps, interactive thingamajigs and technologies for art, music, education, business and healthcare.

generation2018

Opens: 1pm-5pm Thursday 7 June
Bar & performances: 5pm-9pm Thursday 7 June

Goldsmiths Student Union Bar
Dixon Road, Goldsmiths, University of London

GENERATION website

Goldsmiths’ MIMIC project: ‘Cyborg’ musicians could be the future of music

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Massive Attack at Weekendance 2007 in Barcelona. Photo: Alterna2

Musicians will be able to use Artificial Intelligence to create new music and sound to share or sell, thanks to a project led by Goldsmiths.

At a time when many in the music industry worry their livelihoods are under threat from new technology, the MIMIC (Musically Intelligent Machines Interacting Creatively) project puts humans back in control of making music.

MIMIC will develop free, user-friendly web tools that harness the power of AI to listen to existing recordings and come up with new sounds and instruments interactively. Artists will own the sounds they create and can incorporate them into their music or sell them to others. The tools will meld the latest ‘deep learning’ AI methods with people’s creativity to empower a new generation of ‘cyborg’ musicians.

The £1m project is a collaboration between Goldsmiths, the University of Durham, the University of Sussex, and Google Magenta and has been funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

Mick Grierson, Professor of Computing at Goldsmiths and MIMIC project leader said: “In the past, to use these powerful Artificial Intelligence technologies you had to be an expert in programming: we want to make these technologies free and easy for anyone to use – from amateur music-makers and sonic experimenters to professional musicians.

“Rather than simply creating autonomous musical ‘robots’, we are harnessing Artificial Intelligence systems to augment human creativity. We’re inviting people to meld their musical talents and sonic curiosity to the very latest deep learning systems. Our interfaces will mean you don’t have to already know how to code to benefit from AI, you just have to want to make some noise. However, if you do want to code, you’ll be able to do so using a new language we will be creating specifically for making AI music systems.”

The AI technology powering MIMIC has already proved a hit with professional musicians: Massive Attack are currently using it to create new musical instruments for the upcoming tour celebrating the 20th anniversary of their Mezzanine album. Back in 2016, Sigur Ros used a similar system built by Grierson to create an evolving version of a single song for a 24-hour televised journey around the Icelandic coast. Now the Goldsmiths-led team wants to make these technologies accessible to anyone with an interest in musical creation and exploration.

The MIMIC team aim to upload the first prototype web tools for people to experiment with within the next year. The tools will use a browser-based simplified live coding language written on top of JavaScript specially designed for musicians and artists. As well as working with the music industry, the team plan to produce learning materials for university, secondary school, and professional learners introducing them to how they can enhance their creativity with AI systems.


 

This post, written by Pete Wilton, was originally published on Goldsmiths News

BSc Digital Arts Computing degree show

Exit Strategy from Goldsmiths Computing on Vimeo.

The degree show for BSc Digital Arts Computing launches on Thursday 3 May.

Titled EXIT STRATEGY, the exhibition features over 30 computational artists, using digital technologies to create works on surveillance, artificial intelligence, art theory and the end of humanity.

Artworks include cliquey robots, a VR gallery, life stories from the Soviet era, haptic devices simulating human touch, sonified data, and a toddler exposed to the internet.

The exhibition launches with the ever-popular opening night party, 5.30pm-9.30pm Thursday 3 May 2018, with guests from across the world of art, curating and digital practice. Get free tickets for the party

EXIT STRATEGY continues from Friday 4 until Monday 7 May, 12noon – 5pm each day.


EVENT: Digital Art’s Exit Strategies
3pm – 4.30pm Saturday 5 May
We invite artists, theorists and curators Suhail Malik, Ami Clarke and Bob Bicknell-Knight to respond to the exhibition and propose art and curatorial strategies for exits. Open to all.


MA students create Playful Experiences podcast

30740277_10156071513906138_3200763693751074816_nStudents on the MA Independent Games & Playable Experience Design have  regular podcast talking about their experiences and loves.

Listen below, or catch them on iTunes, Stitcher or Soundcloud.


EPISODE ONE: It’s Alive!
Join us for our inaugural episode as students Matthew, Ben and Tommy sit down to chat about games, university life in London, the importance of embracing failure, and more!


EPISODE TWO: The New Challengers!
Matthew, Ben and Tommy as they are joined this week by newcomers Billy, Ece, and Doruk to discuss Games, Design, and student life in London. This week we discuss the importance of the magic circle, player agency, and narrative choice with a discussion on Stardew Valley, Prey, Gone Home, Life Is Strange, What Remains of Edith Finch, Hollow Knight, Bury Me My Love and more.


EPISODE THREE: Life in London
Join Matthew, Billy, Tommy and Alex as they discuss their chosen course of study, what it’s like returning to school, life in London, and arcade culture!


EPISODE FOUR: Narrative Games and Voice Over Artistry
This week we have a visit from a very special guest, voiceover actress Natalie Winter. We discuss what it’s like to work in a recording booth and how best to incorporate voice over into our games. And we have a massive discussion about both the physical and digital in gaming; from The Town of Light, Before I Forget, Fragments of Him, to Forbidden Desert, Pandemic Legacy, Dungeons and Dragons, and all the way to Super Mario Odyssey, Assassin’s Creed, Skyrim VR and TWINE.


EPISODE FIVE: End of Term
This week, we discuss Horizon: Zero Dawn and other open-world games, developing for virtual reality, share some of our thoughts from the end of the first lecture term, and have a deep discussion about some of the projects that we’ve been working on.


The podcast team invite you to chat to them at contact@playfulexperiences.com and on twitter @_experienceplay.

New model reveals forgotten influencers and ’sleeping beauties’ of science

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The influence of ‘forgotten’ scientific papers has been demonstrated in a new study led by a researcher from Goldsmiths, University of London.

A team from Goldsmiths, the University of Chicago, Google, the University of Maryland, and Columbia University, developed a model that tracks ‘discursive influence’, or recurring words and phrases in historical texts that measure how scholars actually talk about a field, instead of just their attributions. To determine a particular scientific paper’s influence, the researchers can statistically remove it from history and see how scientific discourse would have unfolded without it.

aaron-gerow380Aaron Gerow, Lecturer in Computing at Goldsmiths, who led t
he study said: “Citations are one kind of impact, and discursive influence is a different kind. Neither one is the complete story, but they work together to give a better picture of what’s influencing science.”

The researchers report in the journal PNAS how they trained the model on massive text collections from computational linguistics, physics, and across science and scholarship (JSTOR) and then traced distinct patterns of influence. They found that scientists who persistently published in a single field were more likely to be ‘canonised’ in a way that compelled others to cite them disproportionate to their papers’ discursive contributions. On the other hand, discoveries that crossed disciplinary boundaries were more likely to have outsized discursive impact but fewer citations, likely because the ‘owner’ of the idea and her allies remain socially and institutionally distant from the citing author.

The model also sheds light on so-called ‘sleeping beauties’: papers that went relatively unacknowledged for years or even decades before experiencing a late burst of citations. For example, a 1947 paper on graphene remained obscure and forgotten until the 1990s with a resurgence of research interest in the material and an eventual Nobel Prize.

Study co-author James Evans, director of Knowledge Lab and professor of sociology at the University of Chicago, said: “Papers have a news cycle, when lots of people chat about them and cite them, and then they’re no longer new news. Our model shows that some papers have much more influence than citations will typically demonstrate, such as these ‘sleeping beauties,’ which didn’t have much influence early but come to be appreciated and important later.”

The study used a computational method known as ‘topic modeling’ that was invented by co-author David Blei of Columbia University. The authors said the same model can also be used to trace influence in other areas, such as literature and music. Text from poems or song lyrics, and even extra-textual characteristics such as stanza structure or chord progressions, could feed into the model to find under-credited influencers and map the spread of new concepts and innovations.

A report of the research, ‘Measuring discursive influence across scholarship’ by Aaron Gerow, Yuening Hu, Jordan Boyd-Graber, David M. Blei and James A. Evans, is published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


This article is based on an original story written by Rob Mitchum for University of Chicago News, which was then adapted by Peter Wilton for Goldsmiths News.


Goldsmiths Computing student shortlisted for Undergraduate of the Year

A third year Computing student has made it into the final of Target Jobs’ Undergraduate of the Year, in the Science & Computing category.

The organisers describe their ideal winner as “someone who can demonstrate a real passion for technology and the ability to communicate their innovative mindset with others”. They will win a month’s internship at FDM, a global professional services provider with a focus on IT.

highres_2665890643rd year Francesco Perticarari got through to the assessment stage by completing maths, computing and psychometric tests, and writing about a piece of technology that he is working on.

“At the moment, I’m building Silicon Roundabout, an online hub to help startups and tech ideas at any stage of development connect with investors, early adopters, and software developers / employees.

“When I got through to the assessment day, I wasn’t sure about what to expect and I remember walking in fairly casual, only to find out that everyone else was in a suit. Despite that I felt fairly relaxed because all the other attendees were quite friendly and fun and we linked up quickly. We were asked to do a group test including time management, organisational skills, and presentation.

“After that we had individual interviews. I was asked to explain why I should win this internship and I said: Because I’ve worked really hard, and if I don’t know something, I keep looking for the right people who can help me, and then annoy them until I get it.

Last week the organisers announced that Francesco had made it into the top ten. The winner will be announced at a networking lunch event in April. The business-savvy student says: “This event will give me a chance to connect with interesting people in the industry that could possibly help my Silicon Roundabout project gain traction.”

Good luck, Francesco!